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  • The scene relates Krishna became a gopi for Radha from Gita Govinda of Jaydeva. The artist illustrates the scene very interestingly. Krishna bedecked himself as female. He is wearing golden ornaments and pink sari with green border. The dark complexion gopi is very close gesture conversing with Radha. Brilliant colours, the romantic presentation and the figures are typical of the Neo Bengal School Style of 20th century. According to the Gita Govinda, where Krishna said to the Sakhi: "Please tell Radha that I am still with her. The lotuses that bloom in the Yamuna have been coloured by me and the yellow blossoms on the mango tree have opened because of my love and clang of peacocks and the clouds of Shravan pour rain. They do so because of my love and when two birds sing to each other they speak of my love for her"- Kanha Priya.
  • Contemporary painting depicting - a coy-lady by Sunayani Devi.
  • Contemporary Painting depicting - Radha by Sunayani Devi (Side profile of a lady).
  • Watercolour on paper by Sunayani Devi depicting Radha and Krisna standing side by side.
  • Contemporary painting depicting the bust portrait of a lady (a newly wedded bride) by Sunayani Devi.
  • Sunayani Devi, considered as a primitivist, was born to a family of talented writers and painters. Her uncle was Rabindranath Tagore and her older brothers were Abanindranath and Gaganendranath. From the start her paintings have been considered bold, original, resembling ancient Jain paintings in their hieratic quality. While her initial style was very similar to Abanindranath's, employing the wash technique to its fullest, her later paintings, reflected an ideation arising from the encounter with village clay dolls that often adorned urban homes, and Kalighat pats. The modernist discourse of primitive simplicity and the nationalist discourse of cultural authenticity come together in the image of Sunayani Devi as a nationalist artist. Critical reviews of her paintings, have called her a naïve painter, who used folk motifs with immense charm and feeling.
  • Sunayani Devi, considered as a primitivist, was born to a family of talented writers and painters. Her uncle was Rabindranath Tagore and her older brothers were Abanindranath and Gaganendranath. From the start her paintings have been considered bold, original, resembling ancient Jain paintings in their hieratic quality. While her initial style was very similar to Abanindranath's, employing the wash technique to its fullest, her later paintings, reflected an ideation arising from the encounter with village clay dolls that often adorned urban homes, and Kalighat pats. The modernist discourse of primitive simplicity and the nationalist discourse of cultural authenticity come together in the image of Sunayani Devi as a nationalist artist. Critical reviews of her paintings, have called her a naïve painter, who used folk motifs with immense charm and feeling.
  • The above painting is in watercolour.
  • The above painting is in watercolour.