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  • In 1929, Amrita Sher-Gil joined the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and developed therein a visual language characteristic of 'Western' sensibilities, with its naturalism and textured application of paint. By the mid 1930's, Sher-Gil's style of painting underwent a radical change where the colours, textures, vibrancy and the earthiness of the people had a deep impact on the young artist. This painting depicts a seated young man holding three apples in his hands. The man's gaze does not meet the viewer, unlike many of Sher-Gil's portraits, and his head is tilted at at angle as he looks downwards.
  • In 1929, Amrita Sher-Gil joined the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and developed therein a visual language characteristic of 'Western' sensibilities, with its naturalism and textured application of paint. By the mid 1930's, Sher-Gil's style of painting underwent a radical change where the colours, textures, vibrancy and the earthiness of the people had a deep impact on the young artist. In this painting we see a young girl standing, holding her plaited hair in her right hand. her body posture, and her smiling face that looks at the viewer suggest her playful demeanour. Her waist is covered with a white skirt while she is in the nude from waist above. The artist's fascination seems to be focused on the young girl's simplicity of clothes and jewelry, reflective of her 'village' background. The "Indian body" is also given attention by Sher- Gil, wherein she emphasizes on the young girl's long slender waist, and arms. It is evident that Sher-Gil's transformation of style is complete by this period, and the focus is now not so much on realistic portrayal, but thematic and colour scheme. As Geeta Kapur has written, Amrita Sher-Gil had to 'act out the paradox of the oriental subject in the body of a woman designated as Eurasian - a hybrid body of unusual beauty'
  • In 1929, Amrita Sher-Gil joined the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and developed therein a visual language characteristic of 'Western' sensibilities, with its naturalism and textured application of paint. By the mid 1930's, Sher-Gil's style of painting underwent a radical change where the colours, textures, vibrancy and the earthiness of the people had a deep impact on the young artist. The painting depicts three nude figures: one seated at the centre, and two on either side. The central figure with her head tilted to her right has an expression of grief. In the foreground we see ornaments scattered on the floor. It is evident that Sher-Gil's transformation of style is complete by this period, and the focus is now not so much on realistic portrayal, but thematic and colour scheme. As Geeta Kapur has written, Amrita Sher-Gil had to 'act out the paradox of the oriental subject in the body of a woman designated as Eurasian - a hybrid body of unusual beauty'
  • In 1929, Amrita Sher-Gil joined the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and developed therein a visual language characteristic of 'Western' sensibilities, with its naturalism and textured application of paint. By the mid 1930's, Sher-Gil's style of painting underwent a radical change where the colours, textures, vibrancy and the earthiness of the people had a deep impact on the young artist. In this self portrait, Amrita Sher-Gil paints herself dressed in an European style attire. She is adorned with a white pearl necklace and a typical European style cap.
  • Rabindranath Tagore's artistic adventure began with doodles that turned crossed-out words and lines into images that assumed expressive and sometimes grotesque forms While Rabindranath Tagore did not acquire technical skill before he began to paint, the resemblance to the state of mind of a child is far more obvious. His work displays a great sense of fantasy rhythm and vitality. Tagore celebrated his creative freedom in his technique which produces a variety of images including fantasized beasts, masks, human faces, landscapes, flowers, birds and trees. Human figures are depicted either as individuals with expressive gestures or in groups in theatrical settings. In portraits produced during the 1930s, he renders the human face in a way reminiscent of a mask or persona. Tagore himself seldom spoke about his paintings: 'People often ask me about the meaning of my pictures. I remain silent even as my pictures are.'
  • Abdur Rahman Chughtai, was one of the prominent orientalists from outside Bengal, who created his own unique, distinctive painting style influenced by Mughal art, miniature painting, Art Nouveau and Islamic art traditions. He is considered 'the first significant modern Muslim artist from South Asia', and the national artist of Pakistan. Early on in his career Chughtai did a series of wash and tempera on paper, which exuded the visual language of the Bengal School. The characters in the painting, most often couples, were portrayed as if in a state of trance. They were drawn gracefully, with a lyrical quality to every line. The features of these characters bear a string resemblance to the mural paintings at Ajanta, which were a strong influence on Chughtai's artistic sensibilities. By the 1940s he had created his own style, strongly influenced by Islamic art traditions, but retaining a feel of Art Nouveau. His subject matter was drawn from legends, folklore and history of the Indo-Islamic world, as well as Punjab, Persia and the world of the Mughals.
  • In 1929, Amrita Sher-Gil joined the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and developed therein a visual language characteristic of 'Western' sensibilities, with its naturalism and textured application of paint. By the mid 1930's, Sher-Gil's style of painting underwent a radical change where the colours, textures, vibrancy and the earthiness of the people had a deep impact on the young artist. This painting depicts two rural women: one seated and one standing, possibly in conversation with each other. Both the women have their heads covered with an odhni (dupatta). They are dressed in a traditional attire. In the background we see the foliage of a banana tree. The angles of gaze between the two women that meet at a perpendicular angle with one looking down at the seated figure and the other looking out at the viewer, makes for a complex visual dialogue. It is evident that Sher-Gil's transformation of style is complete by this period, and the focus is now not so much on realistic portrayal, but thematic and colour scheme. As Geeta Kapur has written, Amrita Sher-Gil had to 'act out the paradox of the oriental subject in the body of a woman designated as Eurasian - a hybrid body of unusual beauty'
  • Kshitindranath Majumdar was an influential figure of the Bengal School of Art which flourished between 1905 and 1920. He restricted himself to Vaishnavite and literary themes, evolving a mannered style in which languid, elongated figures generally appear against simple backgrounds with trees and shrubs. In this painting, influences from the paintings at Ajanta and Far Eastern techniques are evident.
  • Abdur Rahman Chughtai, was one of the prominent orientalists from outside Bengal, who created his own unique, distinctive painting style influenced by Mughal art, miniature painting, Art Nouveau and Islamic art traditions. He is considered 'the first significant modern Muslim artist from South Asia', and the national artist of Pakistan. Early on in his career Chughtai did a series of wash and tempera on paper, which exuded the visual language of the Bengal School. The characters in the painting, most often couples, were portrayed as if in a state of trance. They were drawn gracefully, with a lyrical quality to every line. The features of these characters bear a string resemblance to the mural paintings at Ajanta, which were a strong influence on Chughtai's artistic sensibilities. By the 1940s he had created his own style, strongly influenced by Islamic art traditions, but retaining a feel of Art Nouveau. His subject matter was drawn from legends, folklore and history of the Indo-Islamic world, as well as Punjab, Persia and the world of the Mughals.
  • A profile view of a bearded man, in a saffron robe, immersed in his writing, his feet placed on a low stool, this painting reveals the artists' early skill and style of painting in tempera. Beside the man, who is most likely the artists' uncle Rabindranath Tagore, rests a potted plant that has two white flowers. The background is divided into two coloured planes showing the tree tops that litter the horizon. The focus of the painting is on the seated monk like figure whose almost meditative intent is on his writing. Abanindranath's inner urge for liberating Indian art was further inspired by Okakura, a great Japanese artist and art-critic who came to India with Swami Vivekananda. His work has a great delicacy of feeling, unity of concept, a highly sensitive range of color, tone, texture and poetic depth. His work was a mixture of traditionalism and innovation. He aimed at comparing nature in its transient forms and produce an image part object, part sensuous, both transposed into each other. But his vision on nature was always poetic, as was his personal form of expression.